The Latest

Apr 23, 2014 / 232,549 notes

king-of-westeros:

kingofwesteros:

in the game of urls you win or you hyphen

you’re telling me mate

(via lil-bit-ghei)

older-and-far-away:

kirbomatic:

happy earth day friends

this is…the best possible use of this particular gif. 
Apr 22, 2014 / 127,197 notes

older-and-far-away:

kirbomatic:

happy earth day friends

this is…the best possible use of this particular gif. 

(via ghost-anus)

fallen-inspiration:

Marvel Cinematic Universe 2014-2018:
Guardians of the GalaxyAvengers: Age of UltronAnt-ManDoctor StrangeThor III: RagnarokBlack PantherCaptain America III: RebornThe Invincible Iron Man (Iron Man IV)Avengers III
Apr 22, 2014 / 7,267 notes

fallen-inspiration:

Marvel Cinematic Universe 2014-2018:

Guardians of the Galaxy
Avengers: Age of Ultron
Ant-Man
Doctor Strange
Thor III: Ragnarok
Black Panther
Captain America III: Reborn
The Invincible Iron Man (Iron Man IV)
Avengers III

(via khaleesi)

Apr 22, 2014 / 404 notes

Raising Taxes on Corporations that Pay Their CEOs Royally and Treat Their Workers Like Serfs

robertreich:

Until the 1980s, corporate CEOs were paid, on average, 30 times what their typical worker was paid. Since then, CEO pay has skyrocketed to 280 times the pay of a typical worker; in big companies, to 354 times.

Meanwhile, over the same thirty-year time span the median American worker has seen no pay increase at all, adjusted for inflation. Even though the pay of male workers continues to outpace that of females, the typical male worker between the ages of 25 and 44 peaked in 1973 and has been dropping ever since. Since 2000, wages of the median male worker across all age brackets has dropped 10 percent, after inflation.

This growing divergence between CEO pay and that of the typical American worker isn’t just wildly unfair. It’s also bad for the economy. It means most workers these days lack the purchasing power to buy what the economy is capable of producing — contributing to the slowest recovery on record. Meanwhile, CEOs and other top executives use their fortunes to fuel speculative booms followed by busts.

Anyone who believes CEOs deserve this astronomical pay hasn’t been paying attention. The entire stock market has risen to record highs. Most CEOs have done little more than ride the wave.

There’s no easy answer for reversing this trend, but this week I’ll be testifying in favor of a bill introduced in the California legislature that at least creates the right incentives. Other states would do well to take a close look.

The proposed legislation, SB 1372, sets corporate taxes according to the ratio of CEO pay to the pay of the company’s typical worker. Corporations with low pay ratios get a tax break.Those with high ratios get a tax increase.

For example, if the CEO makes 100 times the median worker in the company, the company’s tax rate drops from the current 8.8 percent down to 8 percent. If the CEO makes 25 times the pay of the typical worker, the tax rate goes down to 7 percent.

On the other hand, corporations with big disparities face higher taxes. If the CEO makes 200 times the typical employee, the tax rate goes to 9.5 percent; 400 times, to 13 percent.

The California Chamber of Commerce has dubbed this bill a “job killer,” but the reality is the opposite. CEOs don’t create jobs.Their customers create jobs by buying more of what their companies have to sell — giving the companies cause to expand and hire.

So pushing companies to put less money into the hands of their CEOs and more into the hands of average employees creates more buying power among people who will buy, and therefore more jobs.

The other argument against the bill is it’s too complicated. Wrong again. The Dodd-Frank Act already requires companies to publish the ratios of CEO pay to the pay of the company’s median worker (the Securities and Exchange Commission is now weighing a proposal to implement this). So the California bill doesn’t require companies to do anything more than they’ll have to do under federal law. And the tax brackets in the bill are wide enough to make the computation easy.

What about CEO’s gaming the system? Can’t they simply eliminate low-paying jobs by subcontracting them to another company – thereby avoiding large pay disparities while keeping their own compensation in the stratosphere?

No. The proposed law controls for that. Corporations that begin subcontracting more of their low-paying jobs will have to pay a higher tax.  

For the last thirty years, almost all the incentives operating on companies have been to lower the pay of their workers while increasing the pay of their CEOs and other top executives. It’s about time some incentives were applied in the other direction.

The law isn’t perfect, but it’s a start. That the largest state in America is seriously considering it tells you something about how top heavy American business has become, and why it’s time to do something serious about it.

(via madmaudlingoes)

Apr 21, 2014 / 111,502 notes

blankbabe:

we are the last generation whose baby photos weren’t taken on phones

(via cozcat)

Apr 21, 2014 / 324,207 notes

deadgilberts:

the best thing that ever happened to me in high school was about 6 years ago our teacher never showed up for class and neither did the sub so one of the guys in the class just got up and started discussing his various theories about the island in lost and started drawing different diagrams on the board and ranting about his fan theories and everybody just went with it and raised their hands for him like he was the teacher and that was the class. 

(via kittenfeathers)

Apr 21, 2014 / 13,463 notes
  • jk rowling’s reasoning as to why fenrir greyback turned remus into a werewolf: remus’s father insulted him so he did it as an act of revenge

  • the actual reason greyback bit remus: the temptation to succumb to the fact that biting remus whose name literally means ‘werewolf’ would be the greatest feat in lycanthropic irony the world had ever seen
Apr 21, 2014 / 25,487 notes

Anonymous asked: Why does Chris Evans always grab his left boob when he laughs?

officialchelso:

Hello, anon, and thank you for the question.

This topic has been studied by by researchers for years. There are three prevailing theories that I will relay to you now.

1. It keeps him on the ground.

image

You may notice in the gif above that Chris’ leg starts to rise as he laughs, possibly a precursor to his entire body undergoing a sort of lift off due to his joy. Chris then employs his upper body strength to force himself to obey the laws of gravity.

2. To check on his physique.

image

As you may be aware, anon, it takes a lot of hard work to maintain a superhero body. Chris is concerned that in the time he has spent sitting down, sans working out or eating, he has lost muscle mass. Understandably, he feels the need to make sure that he is still a specimen.

3. Object permanence.

image

Object permanence is a term applied to the understanding that an object still exists even when you cannot see it. Chris closes his eyes when he laughs, making him unable to see that he has not disappeared. By grabbing his left boob, Chris knows that he has not somehow ceased to exist.

I hope this helps.

Apr 20, 2014 / 179,492 notes

What happens when teens are home alone

  • According to social media: wild and crazy party time!
  • Me: fuck yeah I can take my headphones off
Apr 18, 2014 / 449,928 notes

stabilizedinsanity:

facethedawn:

This is a very important message for young people everywhere

The Hobbits approve

(via free-batch-lover)